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Help on Determining Colors for Lights
http://gopinball.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=55&t=9784
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Author:  GeorgeH [ Fri Apr 12, 2019 3:53 pm ]
Post subject:  Help on Determining Colors for Lights

I have been experimenting with colors of lights. I found that I sometimes would get to a point where I would say to myself, "If I could select a color between these 2 colors, it would be just right."

I found this web site where you can do just that:

https://meyerweb.com/eric/tools/color-blend/#:::rgbd

FP uses RGB colors. The RGB option on this site requires that you separate the RGB numbers with commas like this: 255, 60, 21

Sometimes I find say to myself, "I would like to add more green or red to this color." You can do this also but you need to know the standard RGB values for named colors. I have listed them here:

Red 255, 0, 0
Green 0, 128, 0
Blue 0, 0, 255
Purple 128, 0, 128
Yellow 255, 255, 0
Orange 255, 165, 0 (Some sites say it is 255, 128, 0. You can try both.)

The site has a handy option called "Midpoints". If you select "1", it will list the 2 colors you entered with the mixed color in between. Entering a higher number will produce a gradient with different mixes of the 2 colors. If you need more gradients than what the 10 color option provides, you can replace "Color1" or "Color2" with one of the colors in the "Palette" list.

MORE ADVANCED OPTION

To make a color darker, you can just use the slider to add more black but you can mix a complementary color also. Artists tend to mix a complement to a chosen color because it produces a richer color. A complementary color is the color directly opposite a color on the color wheel. I found this site that gives you the complementary color for any color you select (use the option for "Complementary" and not "Split Complementary"). Then you can use the Color Blender site to mix the complementary color to your selected color.

This site provides a calculator that identifies complementary colors along with some other matching color options:

https://www.rapidtables.com/web/color/color-wheel.html

George

Author:  francisco666 [ Fri Apr 12, 2019 5:46 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Help on Determining Colors for Lights

Many thanks George, great tool direct to the bookmark.

If you let me add, I usually use the kelvin asosiated color for a typical bulb of 40-60w, which is within the scale of 2200 and 2700 kelvins degree, as reference. Since old pinballs use incandecent bulbs and the light source was the heat of the filament.

I use this page, in which the first numbers are the kelvin degrees, and the lates are the RGB (not the #ff....) values of the color

http://www.vendian.org/mncharity/dir3/blackbody/UnstableURLs/bbr_color.html

Author:  GeorgeH [ Fri Apr 12, 2019 6:37 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Help on Determining Colors for Lights

I see that all the listings on this page that are 2200 to 2700 degrees kelvin are either orange or blue. How do you get the other colors?

Author:  francisco666 [ Fri Apr 12, 2019 8:24 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Help on Determining Colors for Lights

I dont know if there is such a thing :oops:

I use that for choose a GI light color and then when I have it I use Photoshop to see how the light temerature impact on something.

I do as follow: open the image or whatever thing is going to change by the GI light and then use:
Image -> Adjustments -> Photo Filter....

That will open a Pop-Up dialog window where you can use some color presets or asign the filter color just clicking in the square color and enter the color asosiated to the temperature, then you can choose the % intencity.

Photoshop have yet another feature:
Filter -> Camera Raw Filter.... (or ctrl+shift+a)
It have a lot of options and one is a slide to change the temperature, is not so great since the measture is a scale between -100 +100 .

Lightroom, another Adobe software, have the same feature, but it have the temperature setting measure in kelvins

Author:  GeorgeH [ Fri Apr 12, 2019 10:40 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Help on Determining Colors for Lights

I suppose that an incandescent light only produces a yellowish orange light. I presume that that old tables used filters on incandescent lights to make other colors. Incandescent light would limit the number of colors even when filtered. So I can see how your process might produce more authentic color.

Of course, many tables use LED lights today which come in many colors. I've seen videos of some tables refurbished with LEDs and some of them don't seem to look quite right.

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